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The graph that shows why 2020 is year from hell

If you've absolutely had it with 2020, here's the graph to explain why.

Breath deep, and take a look.

The first three months of this year were especially hellish.

Graph showing major events so far in 2020.

The coronavirus doubled down on deadly bushfires and brutal weather events, causing untold financial and emotional damage.

Not only have Australians been cut off from the world, we've been separated from one another.

The result?

We're in an economic depression and emotionally many of us are probably feeling the same.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison said in March that 2020 would for many of us be the toughest year we'd ever live through. It was our year of war.

Drought had already taken a significant toll in the lead-up to 2020.

Extended dry weather patterns laid the foundations for the bushfires that followed.

READ MORE: Think 2020's disasters are wild? Experts see worse in future

Large areas of New South Wales and Queensland were affected by drier than normal conditions, since 2017.

By August 2018, all of NSW and large parts of Queensland were in drought.

And at the end of last year, the Bureau of Meteorology declared 2019 Australia's warmest and driest year on record.

Fast forward to early January 2020, and fires were burning across the country.

Smoke from the bushfires blanketed Australia's south-east for many months.

A 2009 file photo showing fire fighters battling bushfires at the Bunyip State Forest near the township of Tonimbuk, Victoria. The Black Saturday bushfires claimed the lives of at least 173 people.hail at canberraA young boy climbs on the rocks at Mrs Macquarie's Chair as smoke haze from bushfires in New South Wales blankets the CBD in Sydney

An Australian Bureau of Statistics report said suffocating smoke over Sydney, Victoria and Canberra caused "substantial adverse ecological, economic and social effects, including on public health".

Freak hailstorms, large dust storms and giant electrical weather patterns then hit the eastern states, causing extensive damage.

Tropical Cyclone Damien struck Western Australia, and Cyclone Esther tracked across the Northern Territory and the Kimberley region.

In late January, with the bushfires finally under control, Australia began to record a small but steady stream of COVID-19 cases.

There was talk of a strange new virus in a Chinese city called Wuhan.

Cases numbers grew.

Mr Morrison announced travel bans, escalating in severity.

Then came the social distancing restrictions, which ended with a nationwide lockdown.

Unimaginable numbers of Aussies were pitched out of work.

The Ruby Princess sat stranded. There were fights over toilet paper. Our airlines were grounded. Some businesses will never recover.

NSW Police Rescue officers look on as the Ruby Princess, with 1040 crew  onboard, docks at Port Kembla, Wollongong.

Many Aussies, facing financial hardship, plundered their pensions for $30 billion. The impact of that decision may not be realised for decades.

As cases subsided, we emerged out of lockdown.

But then in June a second wave surged through Victoria.

Curfews were imposed, borders were locked.

The coronavirus death toll spiralled. Sadly, today its sits at 824, with most of the dead in Victoria.

It's 14 weeks to Christmas.

Roll on New Year's Eve.

Contact: msaunoko@nine.com.au

FOLLOW: Mark Saunokonoko on Twitter

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Source: 9News https://www.9news.com.au/national/the-graph-that-shows-why-2020-has-been-year-from-hell-for-australians/1405a7a5-ba03-4ad9-93e1-9945ae309e12

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