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Lowering Calories by Just 14% Enhances Your Health

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A study published by Yale University demonstrated a simple, efficient and cost-effective method of weight loss was calorie restriction.1,2 In addition to helping control an ever-expanding waistline, calorie restriction may also help promote overall hea…

Trudeau Invokes Emergencies Act in Canada

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Well, well, well. Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau just let the deep state cat out of the bag for all the world to see. The premature disclosure and honest preview of what’s in store for the people of the world is perhaps the silver lining in all…

Dear Mark: How to Freeze Produce

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Dear Mark, Your website inspired me to join a CSA this past year, and I’m looking forward to frequenting my local farmers’ market again this summer. I absolutely love all the produce selections, but this has opened my eyes to how limited I am in the late fall/winter by what’s usually available (and affordable) in the grocery store. (I live in the Northern Plains.) I’d like to begin thinking about freezing some items to enjoy them post-season. What tips do you have for doing this? Thank you! Thanks for the question! You’re correct—as incredible as it is to enjoy fresh veggies and fruits when they are in season, it’s smart to look ahead to the “scarcer” months. One of the best ways to carry over the season’s best, of course, is freezing. (Grok would’ve traded a lot of hides for a deep freeze chest….) This year, as you load up on seasonal produce in the spring, summer, and early fall, here are a few suggestions and resources for the best freezer prep and storage techniques. The week of Feb 21, 2022, Primal Kitchen is featuring ways to cut down on food waste. Find food waste facts, waste reduction tips, exclusive recipes, and resources from the Farmlink Project by signing up here. Set Up Select your freezer space First off, I’d highly recommend investing in a deep freezer. You can certainly make use of the freezer compartment of your refrigerator, but it’s typically a limited space and doesn’t stay as consistently cold as a deep freezer chest. (For best results, freezers should be kept at 0° Fahrenheit or less. A simple freezer gauge can give you an accurate reading.) Although items should still last a number of months, you aren’t going to get the same longevity using your refrigerator freezer (8-12 months for most produce when properly prepped and packaged). If you’re worried about initial cost, keep in mind that there are plenty of good used deep freezers for sale. Check scratch and dent sales, classifieds, and Craigslist for starters. And also keep in mind that you have the potential to recoup much of that money within the first year alone, depending on how much you choose to freeze (produce, meats, etc.). It’s less expensive to buy good quality produce in season and make it last through much of the winter than it is to buy your full produce needs in the off-season. When you add the savings of cowpooling or other bulk meat/poultry/game storage, it won’t be long before your freezer will pay for itself. Storage solutions for produce As for wraps, bags, and such, don’t skimp. You’ll need high-quality storage to keep out moisture. Lined freezer paper and freezer tape can work for “dry” packing produce. Another option, particularly for purees or fruits that will be stored with juice, is freezer-appropriate canning jars. Many people find it more convenient to use plastic freezer bags (either the Ziploc kind or the self-cut kind that requires a heat sealer). In any case, … Continue reading “Dear Mark: How to Freeze Produce”

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If Lockdowns and Mandates Failed, Why Are They Still Pushed?

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Scientists the world over have done a deep dive into the unprecedented lockdowns and injection mandates that characterized the COVID-19 pandemic response. Over and over again, the results confirm what many instinctively knew all along — that these tota…

How to Resolve Food Addiction and End Cravings

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Food addiction, defined as an “eating behavior involving the overconsumption of specific foods in an addiction-like manner,”1 is a common problem. Using a clinical scale called the Yale Food Addiction Severity Scale (YFAS), which was constructed to mat…

How Coconut Oil Can Benefit Your Health

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This article was previously published January 22, 2018, and has been updated with new information.

Despite the fact that more than 2,000 studies1 have been performed on coconut oil, demonstrating a wide range of benefits, it continues to be wrongful…

How to Start Composting

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Composting is one of those things that everyone agrees is good. There are literally no downsides, only benefits. Composting creates nutrient-dense, well-fertilized soil. Composting means “food waste” is no longer wasteful. Composting is better for the environment. Composting organic materials is more productive than simply throwing them away into a landfill. Composting is passive income. You’re not actively breaking down the organic materials. You’re not doing anything except throwing it in the pile or in the container. The microbes handle the rest and you get the benefit. From all perspectives, composting is a smart move. If you just want a healthier garden, composting does that. If you want to improve soil health and fight soil nutrient deficiencies, composting does that. If you want to fight environmental degradation, composting does that. If you just want less stuff in your trash can and in the landfill, composting does that. There’s no reason not to compost. Even if you live in a small space without a yard, you can participate. But how do you get started? The week of Feb 21, 2022, Primal Kitchen is featuring ways to cut down on food waste. Find food waste facts, waste reduction tips, exclusive recipes, and resources from the Farmlink Project by signing up here. All week, MDA will be featuring posts that can help you get the most bang for your grocery budget and minimize food waste to boot! How to Get Started Composting The basic way to get started is to just get started. First, figure out what can and can’t be composted: What to Compost Vegetable and fruit scraps Coffee grounds and paper filters Teabags, old tea leaves Unglossy/matte paper products and cardboard products (including PrimalKitchen.com kraft paper used in shipping!) Yard clippings Leaves, grass Hay and straw Untreated wood chips, sawdust, wood scraps, toothpicks Wine corks Tissues Eggshells (crushed best) Fur, hair, feathers Manure Old bread, cooked pasta Cotton, wool, linen What Not to Compost Plastic Glossy paper products—magazines, “shiny” paper Metal Stone Glass Large branches, wood rounds Pet and human waste Treated wood chips, sawdust, wood scraps Synthetic fabrics Oil So, do you just throw everything from the “What to Compost” list in a big pile or bin out in the yard? Not exactly. You should think of compostable materials in terms of “greens” and “browns.” Greens are wetter materials, higher in nitrogen. Browns are drier, higher in carbon. Greens include: Most kitchen scraps Manure Coffee grounds Fresh (green) grass, leaves, and yard clippings Browns include: Wood scraps, dust, chips Paper, cardboard Hay Dried (brown) grass, leaves, and yard clippings Egg shells Ratio: You want more browns than greens in your compost pile or bin. It doesn’t have to be an exact ratio, but somewhere between 4:1 and 2:1 brown:green is good. “More browns than greens” is good enough. It’s not an exact science, more an art. Your compost should be moist, not soaking wet. It shouldn’t be dry, it shouldn’t be slimy, it should be juuuust right. Layers: You should … Continue reading “How to Start Composting”

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Give Up Soda

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This article was previously published January 10, 2018, and has been updated with new information.

One of the most straightforward steps you can take to improve your health is to give up soda, and with that I’m talking about both regular and diet va…

Is Your Tap Water Making You Sick?

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Drinking water may be treated with a variety of chemicals, which create intermediaries and disinfection byproducts. One study1 did a side-by-side comparison of epidemiological studies and cancer risk assessment after exposure to two disinfection byprod…

How to End Vaccine Mandates — A History Lesson

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If you’re wondering how we’ll ever put an end to these draconian COVID-19 mandates that are destroying lives and sanity across the world, take heart. History can serve us in this regard. The parallels between the COVID-19 pandemic and its countermeasur…

Seasonal Eating: Getting the Most Out of Winter Vegetables

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Keeping on our theme this week of minimizing food waste, today we’re going to talk about seasonal eating and getting the most out of the winter vegetables you’ll find at your farmer’s market and grocery store this time of year. The statistics on food waste are sobering, as discussed yesterday. Reducing food waste takes a multi-pronged approach. Some of the things you can do to waste less food and be more sustainable in the kitchen include: Prioritize the produce that is seasonal in your region. Don’t buy more than you need. Learn how to store food correctly. Learn how to preserve food if you won’t eat it in time. Use the whole plant when possible. (Hint: All of the vegetables we’ll be mentioning today have edible leaves!) Use food scraps in broth, soups, smoothies. Compost what you don’t eat. (More on composting tomorrow!) The week of Feb 21, 2022, Primal Kitchen is featuring ways to cut down on food waste. Find food waste facts, waste reduction tips, exclusive recipes, and resources from the Farmlink Project by signing up here. All week, MDA will be featuring posts that can help you get the most bang for your grocery budget and minimize food waste to boot! What Is Seasonal Eating? Seasonal eating means making an effort to buy vegetables and fruits that are naturally grown and harvested in a given climate. Technically, this can include food grown on the other side of the planet and flown or shipped thousands of miles to your local grocer—for example, apples grown in Chile or New Zealand and sent to New England in winter. They are in season in the region they were grown, hence “seasonal.” Generally speaking, though, when we talk about seasonal eating, we have more locally grown produce in mind. In-season, local fruits and vegetables are likely to be fresher and tastier by the time they make it to your plate, so you’re more apt to eat them. The less they have to travel, the less likely they are to spoil in transit, too, and they’ll carry a smaller ecological footprint. Another benefit of seasonal eating is that it encourages you to diversify your diet throughout the year. For those of us who value variety, eating according to the season means you effortlessly incorporate a diverse array of produce as you move from hearty winter greens, cruciferous vegetables, and citrus fruits to summer berries, tomatoes, cucumber, and zucchini to autumn’s apples and squashes. Of course, your ability to buy in-season and local produce depends very much on where you live. If you’re currently buried under feet of snow, you won’t have the same access to locally grown vegetables as someone who lives in a warmer climate. Gardening websites and resources like the USDA can tell you what grows well in your area and beyond throughout the year. As always, this is a “don’t let perfect be the enemy of good” situation. Eating seasonally is a great goal to strive for, but it shouldn’t … Continue reading “Seasonal Eating: Getting the Most Out of Winter Vegetables”

The post Seasonal Eating: Getting the Most Out of Winter Vegetables appeared first on Mark’s Daily Apple.

From Corrupted to Trusted: Shifting Perceptions of the FDA

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This article was written by John Roulac and originally published here.

Until recently, most Americans had little trust in the FDA. But when COVID arrived in early 2020, a scared nation deepened in tribal identity and then turned its faith …

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