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Is Sunbathing More Important Than Vitamin D?

Published: in Health News by .

I have been absolutely fascinated with the association of sun exposure to health for nearly three decades. It was obvious to me that nearly all dermatologists are seriously confused about avoiding the sun, as sun exposure is essential to stay healthy. …

How to Talk to Your Conspiracy Denialist Friends

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This story is about how to talk to your conspiracy denialist friends about “nanobots in vaccines.” No really, this story is about how to talk to your conspiracy denialist friends about “nanobots in vaccines”!

The Big Picture: From Mandates to the …

Four Powerful Adaptogens for Adrenal Support

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This article was previously published April 9, 2018, and has been updated with new information.

Your body has two adrenal glands located just above each of your kidneys. As part of your endocrine system, your adrenal glands secrete more than 50 ho…

New and Noteworthy: What I Read This Week—Edition 166

Published: in Health News by .

Research of the Week

More meat, longer life.

Colon cancer patients who survive and eat lots of meat do just fine.

Resistance training is the most effective exercise modality for seniors who want to improve cognitive function.

More serum albumin, longer life.

Higher vitamin D levels, more muscle (in Korean adults).

In infertile men, taking vitamin D improves HDL levels and fasting insulin.

New Primal Kitchen Podcasts
Primal Kitchen Podcast, Episode 19: The Secrets on Sexual Optimization and Aging with Dr. Amy Killen
Media, Schmedia
Archaeologists uncover a pristine 7000 year-old shrine where ancient Jordanian hunters corralled and slaughtered gazelles.

Lab leak theory now considered the most likely to be true in many circles.
Interesting Blog Posts
Pre-K simply doesn’t work.
Social Notes
Quite the map.

True security.
Everything Else
On natural wines.

Nice guide to shellfish.
Things I’m Up to and Interested In
Classic: “The Skinny on Fats”

Good letter to the editor: Wonder why it was rejected.

Wonder why: Fake meat companies aren’t doing so well.

Incredible: Teen born without legs wins state wrestling championship.

Not surprising: Meat intake a strong predictor of longevity.
Question I’m Asking
How much time do you spend on the floor?
Recipe Corner

Simple chile paste, sambal oelek.
Squash, pork, apples: the perfect triumvirate.

Time Capsule
One year ago (Feb 19 – Feb 25)

How I’d Change Higher Education — What I’d do.
Orthorexia: Where to Draw the Line Between Healthy Eating and Obsession?— Where’s the line?

Comment of the Week
“Mark i really enjoyed your post today. You made me realize the different types of hunger and whether it was even “real” hunger. Great food for thought today”

-I see what you did there.

The post New and Noteworthy: What I Read This Week—Edition 166 appeared first on Mark’s Daily Apple.

Why Fasting Is a Powerful Treatment Strategy for Diabetes

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This article was previously published April 1, 2018, and has been updated with new information.

We have an epidemic of diabetes in the United States. An estimated 37 million Americans, or 11% of the population, have Type 2 diabetes.1 The numbers h…

Lowering Calories by Just 14% Enhances Your Health

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A study published by Yale University demonstrated a simple, efficient and cost-effective method of weight loss was calorie restriction.1,2 In addition to helping control an ever-expanding waistline, calorie restriction may also help promote overall hea…

Trudeau Invokes Emergencies Act in Canada

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Well, well, well. Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau just let the deep state cat out of the bag for all the world to see. The premature disclosure and honest preview of what’s in store for the people of the world is perhaps the silver lining in all…

Dear Mark: How to Freeze Produce

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Dear Mark, Your website inspired me to join a CSA this past year, and I’m looking forward to frequenting my local farmers’ market again this summer. I absolutely love all the produce selections, but this has opened my eyes to how limited I am in the late fall/winter by what’s usually available (and affordable) in the grocery store. (I live in the Northern Plains.) I’d like to begin thinking about freezing some items to enjoy them post-season. What tips do you have for doing this? Thank you! Thanks for the question! You’re correct—as incredible as it is to enjoy fresh veggies and fruits when they are in season, it’s smart to look ahead to the “scarcer” months. One of the best ways to carry over the season’s best, of course, is freezing. (Grok would’ve traded a lot of hides for a deep freeze chest….) This year, as you load up on seasonal produce in the spring, summer, and early fall, here are a few suggestions and resources for the best freezer prep and storage techniques. The week of Feb 21, 2022, Primal Kitchen is featuring ways to cut down on food waste. Find food waste facts, waste reduction tips, exclusive recipes, and resources from the Farmlink Project by signing up here. Set Up Select your freezer space First off, I’d highly recommend investing in a deep freezer. You can certainly make use of the freezer compartment of your refrigerator, but it’s typically a limited space and doesn’t stay as consistently cold as a deep freezer chest. (For best results, freezers should be kept at 0° Fahrenheit or less. A simple freezer gauge can give you an accurate reading.) Although items should still last a number of months, you aren’t going to get the same longevity using your refrigerator freezer (8-12 months for most produce when properly prepped and packaged). If you’re worried about initial cost, keep in mind that there are plenty of good used deep freezers for sale. Check scratch and dent sales, classifieds, and Craigslist for starters. And also keep in mind that you have the potential to recoup much of that money within the first year alone, depending on how much you choose to freeze (produce, meats, etc.). It’s less expensive to buy good quality produce in season and make it last through much of the winter than it is to buy your full produce needs in the off-season. When you add the savings of cowpooling or other bulk meat/poultry/game storage, it won’t be long before your freezer will pay for itself. Storage solutions for produce As for wraps, bags, and such, don’t skimp. You’ll need high-quality storage to keep out moisture. Lined freezer paper and freezer tape can work for “dry” packing produce. Another option, particularly for purees or fruits that will be stored with juice, is freezer-appropriate canning jars. Many people find it more convenient to use plastic freezer bags (either the Ziploc kind or the self-cut kind that requires a heat sealer). In any case, … Continue reading “Dear Mark: How to Freeze Produce”

The post Dear Mark: How to Freeze Produce appeared first on Mark’s Daily Apple.

If Lockdowns and Mandates Failed, Why Are They Still Pushed?

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Scientists the world over have done a deep dive into the unprecedented lockdowns and injection mandates that characterized the COVID-19 pandemic response. Over and over again, the results confirm what many instinctively knew all along — that these tota…

How to Resolve Food Addiction and End Cravings

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Food addiction, defined as an “eating behavior involving the overconsumption of specific foods in an addiction-like manner,”1 is a common problem. Using a clinical scale called the Yale Food Addiction Severity Scale (YFAS), which was constructed to mat…

How Coconut Oil Can Benefit Your Health

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This article was previously published January 22, 2018, and has been updated with new information.

Despite the fact that more than 2,000 studies1 have been performed on coconut oil, demonstrating a wide range of benefits, it continues to be wrongful…

How to Start Composting

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Composting is one of those things that everyone agrees is good. There are literally no downsides, only benefits. Composting creates nutrient-dense, well-fertilized soil. Composting means “food waste” is no longer wasteful. Composting is better for the environment. Composting organic materials is more productive than simply throwing them away into a landfill. Composting is passive income. You’re not actively breaking down the organic materials. You’re not doing anything except throwing it in the pile or in the container. The microbes handle the rest and you get the benefit. From all perspectives, composting is a smart move. If you just want a healthier garden, composting does that. If you want to improve soil health and fight soil nutrient deficiencies, composting does that. If you want to fight environmental degradation, composting does that. If you just want less stuff in your trash can and in the landfill, composting does that. There’s no reason not to compost. Even if you live in a small space without a yard, you can participate. But how do you get started? The week of Feb 21, 2022, Primal Kitchen is featuring ways to cut down on food waste. Find food waste facts, waste reduction tips, exclusive recipes, and resources from the Farmlink Project by signing up here. All week, MDA will be featuring posts that can help you get the most bang for your grocery budget and minimize food waste to boot! How to Get Started Composting The basic way to get started is to just get started. First, figure out what can and can’t be composted: What to Compost Vegetable and fruit scraps Coffee grounds and paper filters Teabags, old tea leaves Unglossy/matte paper products and cardboard products (including PrimalKitchen.com kraft paper used in shipping!) Yard clippings Leaves, grass Hay and straw Untreated wood chips, sawdust, wood scraps, toothpicks Wine corks Tissues Eggshells (crushed best) Fur, hair, feathers Manure Old bread, cooked pasta Cotton, wool, linen What Not to Compost Plastic Glossy paper products—magazines, “shiny” paper Metal Stone Glass Large branches, wood rounds Pet and human waste Treated wood chips, sawdust, wood scraps Synthetic fabrics Oil So, do you just throw everything from the “What to Compost” list in a big pile or bin out in the yard? Not exactly. You should think of compostable materials in terms of “greens” and “browns.” Greens are wetter materials, higher in nitrogen. Browns are drier, higher in carbon. Greens include: Most kitchen scraps Manure Coffee grounds Fresh (green) grass, leaves, and yard clippings Browns include: Wood scraps, dust, chips Paper, cardboard Hay Dried (brown) grass, leaves, and yard clippings Egg shells Ratio: You want more browns than greens in your compost pile or bin. It doesn’t have to be an exact ratio, but somewhere between 4:1 and 2:1 brown:green is good. “More browns than greens” is good enough. It’s not an exact science, more an art. Your compost should be moist, not soaking wet. It shouldn’t be dry, it shouldn’t be slimy, it should be juuuust right. Layers: You should … Continue reading “How to Start Composting”

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Finance Advice 2021