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Why I’m Being Censored by Spotify

Published: (Updated: ) in Health News by .

In April 2021, Spotify removed my Take Control of Your Health podcast, citing their rules about “prohibited content.”1 The takedown notification stated my podcast was in violation of their content policies, which include a prohibition of infringing con…

The Best Way to Hydrate, According to a Health Coach

Published: (Updated: ) in Health News by .

We’re all looking for the perfect formula, right? Just tell me how many grams of fat and carbs to eat. How many steps to take per day. And how many glasses of water I should be drinking within a 24-hour period. We love the precision of it all. The safety of micromanaging every detail of our life with the promise that if we can dial it in enough, we’ll enjoy perfect health for the rest of our days. But when you think about all the forcing, measuring, counting, and obsessive overplanning that goes into this kind of micromanagement, there’s actually nothing healthy about it. There’s nothing healthy about ignoring your body’s own cues in favor of what general nutrition — or random social media influencers say. Nutrition might be a science, but it’s also an art form. And learning to trust your body and what it’s trying to tell you trumps any water-to weight-ratio chart you’ll find online. But How Much Water Should You Drink? I’ve always followed Mark’s wisdom around water consumption. We both believe that the body has a well-regulated system for preventing dehydration and a built-in mechanism to let you know when we need more water. That internal mechanism is called your thirst. How much water you need is highly individual. Meaning, it depends on your unique circumstances, your activity level, and the climate you live in. Not only that, the advice to drink eight 8-ounce glasses of water a day or half your bodyweight in ounces isn’t based on actual evidence. Those guidelines initially game from the U.S. Food and Nutrition Board recommendations back in 1945, stating that people should drink 2.5 liters of water per day. Unfortunately, people who read that statement neglected to read the following sentence that read, “Most of this quantity is contained in foods.” I know meditation is good for me, but I don’t know how to start. I’ve tried to meditate before, but my mind is too busy. It sounds easy, but it feels hard. Not sure what the hype is all about? Find out why millions of people have been meditating for thousands of years. Meditate with us for 21 days, complete with video meditations, a tracker, and community support! Caffeinated Drinks Work Against You, Right? A review published in the American Journal of Physiology goes even further to debunk the 8 glasses or 2 liter of water per day recommendation. Researchers looked at studies that measured the food and fluid intake of 28,081 men and women in the United States and found that such large volumes of water weren’t necessary for good health. They also found that caffeinated drinks (and to a lesser extent, alcohol) added to hydration levels, specifically noting that nearly one-half (47%) of the total fluids ingested by participants were coffee, tea, soft drinks, and alcohol. So, as a health coach, I don’t push the hydration issue. Instead, I empower my clients to tune into something I think most of us don’t have a good … Continue reading “The Best Way to Hydrate, According to a Health Coach”

The post The Best Way to Hydrate, According to a Health Coach appeared first on Mark’s Daily Apple.

Sickle cell disease in newborns and children: What families should know and do

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Millions of people around the world have sickle cell disease, a genetic condition that can cause pain and damage to organs or tissues, and can make children more susceptible to other health problems. In the US, most cases are diagnosed through screening in newborns. Getting connected to the proper care early in a child’s life can help prevent complications from the disease.

The post Sickle cell disease in newborns and children: What families should know and do appeared first on Harvard Health Blog.

Stay-Home Order Side Effect: Opioid Deaths Nearly Doubled

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March 21, 2020, a stay-at-home order was enacted in Illinois due to the COVID-19 pandemic. It continued for 11 weeks, eventually being lifted May 30, 2020. During those 11 weeks, opioid-involved overdose deaths soared in Chicago and the surrounding sub…

Academic Exposes Media Propaganda

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In the video above, James Corbett of The Corbett Report interviews1 professor Mark Crispin Miller about mass persuasion and propaganda — topics he’s been teaching at the New York University Steinhardt School of Culture, Education and Human Development …

A Fresh Look at High-Protein

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Ten years ago, I ate a high protein diet. I regularly ate and recommended a gram of protein per pound of bodyweight. That meant I was putting down 160, 170 grams of protein a day myself. Later, I moderated my protein intake and focused more on my fat intake, thinking that I’d be better off in the long term eating less protein and using my muscle mass, physical and mental performance, and overall vitality as a “signal” for when protein was too low. Researchers were looking at high protein intakes, noticing they could raise IGF-1 and trigger mTOR, which in some animal models have been linked to cancer and reduced longevity, and positing that lower protein intakes were healthier. I was never “low-protein,” but I certainly ate less than before. I will say that throughout all this time a major determinant of my protein intake was my instinctual hunger for it. When I ate a lot of protein, I did so because I desired it on a base, Primal level. When I ate less, I did so partly because of the research but also because I wasn’t as hungry for it (and my performance never indicated I was lacking). But in recent years, I’ve been eating more protein again. In fact, I eat by most accounts a high-protein diet. Why? What changed? I took a fresh look at the research. I’m always researching. That’s the nature of my work here, and it never stops. As I read more into the protein/IGF-1/longevity connection, I became skeptical of the idea that protein is harmful because it “spikes IGF-1.” It turns out that elevating IGF-1 isn’t necessarily a bad thing; resistance training spikes IGF-1, and the beneficial effects of resistance training are largely dependent on the IGF-1 increase. It turns out that the majority of human research into IGF-1 and longevity shows either a positive relationship (higher IGF-1, longer lifespan) or a neutral one. Really low levels of IFG-1 are bad for longevity, while really high levels are linked to cancer—and even those relationships aren’t totally clear. If protein was spiking IGF-1, that might actually be a good thing. After all, the more protein an older person eats, the longer they live and the healthier they live. The more I looked, the more the evidence for limiting protein seemed to fall apart. The more I realized it consisted almost entirely of myths and misconceptions. I know meditation is good for me, but I don’t know how to start. I’ve tried to meditate before, but my mind is too busy. It sounds easy, but it feels hard. Not sure what the hype is all about? Find out why millions of people have been meditating for thousands of years. Meditate with us for 21 days, complete with video meditations, a tracker, and community support! Common Myths about High Protein Diets What are the most common myths and misconceptions about high protein diets? High protein damages your kidneys I’d already covered the myth that protein is … Continue reading “A Fresh Look at High-Protein”

The post A Fresh Look at High-Protein appeared first on Mark’s Daily Apple.

COVID-19 vaccines for children and teens: What we do — and don’t — know

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Every day, more and more adults are getting vaccinated against COVID-19, helping us build toward herd immunity. But what about children and teens? What is the status of research on the vaccines in these groups, and when might vaccines be available for them?

The post COVID-19 vaccines for children and teens: What we do — and don’t — know appeared first on Harvard Health Blog.

A COVID Lifeline Is Being Severed

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The growing fear during this pandemic is second to nearly no other time in medical history for the depth and breadth of the strategies used to stoke those fears. Emergency use orders, mask mandates and the suppression of health information all support …

US-Funded Lab Helped Chinese Army’s Bioterrorism Program

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In the featured video, investigative journalist Sharyl Attkisson investigates the origin of SARS-CoV-2 and reviews the U.S.-China ties with regard to gain-of-function research on coronaviruses.
Dr. Anthony Fauci is a prominent figure in this scheme, h…

Ways to Get Your Electrolytes (That Aren’t Sports Drinks)

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When we talk about “getting enough electrolytes,” we usually mean the big three: sodium, potassium, and magnesium. There are many others, including calcium, chloride, and bicarbonate, but the big three are the ones targeted by supplement and sports nutrition companies. In part, that’s because sodium especially, but also potassium and magnesium, are lost through sweat. Athletes need to replenish these electrolytes during and after hard workouts or endurance outings in order to maintain optimal hydration and performance. Sodium and potassium work together to manage fluid balance throughout the body and facilitate muscle contractions and nerve firing. Magnesium is critical for cellular energy production and the transport of sodium and potassium across cell membranes. I’m not going to go into a lot of detail about the other functions of electrolytes in the body since Mark recently covered the topic in his Electrolytes 101 post. Suffice it to say that if you don’t maintain the proper levels of electrolytes, you’re in a world of hurt. Should I Be Taking Electrolyte Supplements? Not everyone needs to supplement with electrolytes, but everyone needs to get the right amount. Your kidneys do a good job keeping electrolytes in balance by retaining or excreting specific electrolytes as needed. However, the kidneys can only do their job if you provide enough electrolytes to begin with, and there’s the rub. Even Primal folks who consume abundant produce and animal products may struggle to get enough electrolytes from their food due to mineral-depleted soil. Paleo godfather Loren Cordain speculates that potassium intake in particular lags behind our biological needs. Furthermore, if you’ve jumped on the ketogenic train, you need more electrolytes than the average person. When you drop your carb intake, insulin secretion decreases accordingly. This triggers ketone production as well as a rapid flush of electrolytes. Failure to replenish lost electrolytes, particularly sodium, is probably the number one culprit behind the dreaded keto flu. Sports drinks are not the best way to up your electrolyte intake, though. Most of them are designed to provide energy (read: sugar) and hydration first and foremost. They probably won’t offer the amount of electrolytes you want, plus they usually contain other undesirable ingredients you don’t need. Luckily, it’s easy to up your electrolyte intake with better, more Primal-friendly sources. I know meditation is good for me, but I don’t know how to start. I’ve tried to meditate before, but my mind is too busy. It sounds easy, but it feels hard. Not sure what the hype is all about? Find out why millions of people have been meditating for thousands of years. Meditate with us for 21 days, complete with video meditations, a tracker, and community support! How Much Sodium, Potassium, and Magnesium Do You Need? Sodium: The current recommended daily intake for adults is 1,500 mg per day, but that’s probably not enough for most people. The sweet spot seems to be between 4 and 6 grams per day for adults who do not have salt-sensitive hypertension or kidney disease. Potassium: … Continue reading “Ways to Get Your Electrolytes (That Aren’t Sports Drinks)”

The post Ways to Get Your Electrolytes (That Aren’t Sports Drinks) appeared first on Mark’s Daily Apple.

Happy trails: Take a hike, now

Published: (Updated: ) in Health News by .

After too much time spent indoors (and probably less active than is healthy), getting outside and taking a hike is a great way to get some exercise while enjoying nature. But before you hit the trail, make sure you’re well prepared.

The post Happy trails: Take a hike, now appeared first on Harvard Health Blog.

How DARPA Took Over Pentagon Internet on Inauguration Day

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Just three minutes before Donald Trump left office on inauguration day, a “shadowy” company1 called Global Resource Systems LLC received control of tens of millions of Pentagon-owned IP addresses that were previously dormant.2

The U.S. Department o…

Finance Advice 2021