Breaking News Today

Sea Shepherd Names Top Plastic Polluters

Published: (Updated: ) in Australian News by .

The Coca-Cola Company, PepsiCo and Nestlé are ranked as the world’s top plastic polluters for the 3rd consecutive year according to Break Free From Plastic‘s new report BRANDED Vol III: Demanding Corporate Accountability for Plastic Pollution.¹ Sea Shepherd represented Australia in the 2020 Global Brand Audit conducting seven brand audits across four states during beach […]

The Coca-Cola Company, PepsiCo and Nestlé are ranked as the world’s top plastic polluters for the 3rd consecutive year according to Break Free From Plastic‘s new report BRANDED Vol III: Demanding Corporate Accountability for Plastic Pollution

Sea Shepherd represented Australia in the 2020 Global Brand Audit conducting seven brand audits across four states during beach clean-ups.

“We recovered and audited over 1,100 items of branded plastic which were found polluting Australian beaches and coastlines. Over 450 branded items were recorded,” said Marina Hansen, Sea Shepherd’s National Marine Debris Campaigner.

This year, Break Free From Plastic’s brand audit — an annual citizen action initiative that involves counting and documenting the brands on plastic waste found in communities across the globe collected 346,494 pieces of plastic from 55 countries. In addition, this year’s brand audit took a special look at the essential work of informal waste pickers, predominantly in the Global South, and the impact low-value single-use plastic has on their livelihoods.

“By carrying out this audit we are firmly shining the spotlight on the producers of plastic packaging – much of it single-use – and the resulting pollution and destruction it creates to the environment,” commented Hansen.

Being part of this global movement to identify and contribute to a comprehensive framework for the prevention and reduction of plastic pollution was a natural step for Sea Shepherd, they say.

“With the state of our oceans at crisis levels from plastic pollution we have no choice, we must turn off the tap of plastic and force the big corporations who pump out all this plastic to be held accountable,” said Hansen.

“Multinational corporations need to take full responsibility for the externalised cost of their single-use plastic products, such as the costs of waste collection, treatment and the environmental damage caused by them.

If business as usual continues, plastic production could double by 2030 and even triple by 2050. Time is running out.”

“The world’s top polluting corporations claim to be working hard to solve plastic pollution, but instead they are continuing to pump out harmful single-use plastic packaging. We need to stop plastic production, phase out single-use and implement robust, standardised reuse systems. Coca-Cola, PepsiCo, and Nestlé should be leading the way in finding real solutions,” said Emma Priestland, Global Corporate Campaigns Coordinator, Break Free From Plastic.

READ:  Police officers fined $1,000 for hotel party

“Our oceans are drowning in plastic with marine life, ocean habitats and the places we love paying the true cost,” said Hansen.

1 A GAIA Asia Pacific report titled Plastics Exposed: How Waste Assessments and Brand Audits are Helping Philippine Cities Fight Plastic Pollution, uses data from household waste assessments and brand audits (WABA) conducted by the NGO Mother Earth Foundation (MEF) in six cities and seven municipalities across the country in the past five years. GAIA extrapolated the data to calculate daily and yearly plastic usage throughout the country in order to provide new quantitative evidence about plastic pollution in the Philippines.

Featured image: Sea Shepherd Australia’s Marine Debris Campaign coordinators, Liza Dicks (left) and Marina Hansen (right) with a collage of branded waste items. Images courtesy Sea Shepherd.

Source: Tasmanian Times https://www.tasmaniantimes.com/2020/12/sea-shepherd-names-top-plastic-polluters/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=sea-shepherd-names-top-plastic-polluters

Shares
Share This
Finance Advice 2021