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Lack of Integrated Coastal Management Puts Industries, Environment at Risk

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Towards a sustainable marine management regime: an update on Tasmanian progress

Tasmania’s lack of integrated coastal management putting our industries and environment at risk

New research shows Tasmania’s management of its spectacular marine environment needs urgent attention to ensure Tasmanians can continue to enjoy economic, social, cultural and environmental benefits into the future.

The report, released today by The Australia Institute Tasmania, and the Tasmanian Independent Science Council, shows that an integrated approach to managing Tasmania’s coastal waters is needed across sectors.

Key Recommendations

“We need leadership and collaboration to ensure our coastline is managed in a way that protects jobs, ensures fishing is sustainable, protects the marine environment and respects cultural activities,” said Leanne Minshull, Director, The Australia Institute, Tasmania.

“There are many marine species found only in Tasmanian waters yet—despite increasing pressure from climate change, fishing and aquaculture operations, agricultural run-off, urban development, and population growth—only 1.1% of Tasmania’s marine waters are fully protected, with areas outside MPAs lacking integrated management,” Eloise Carr, Co Author and member of the Tasmanian Independent Science Council, said.

“Tasmania is a place where scientific research has the capacity to play a key role in our ability to manage our marine environment.

Integrated ocean management offers the tools to improve the balance between production and protection by providing a holistic, rather than sector-by-sector based understanding of the system.

“We should seize this opportunity to ensure the sustainability our marine ecosystems and the economic activity that relies on them.”

Summary

Tasmania is a unique and special place, wild in parts and populated in others, nestled inside a spectacular coastline. This little island provides a home for diverse marine ecosystems, supports regional economies, holds cultural significance for First Nations communities and provides recreation for hundreds of thousands of residents and visitors.

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The fishing industry is an important employer in some regions of Tasmania, and the state government has plans to expand it to $1 billion by 2030. Salmon farming, recreational fishing, fishing tourism, commercial wild-catch fisheries and shellfish aquaculture collectively employ 2,900 or more Tasmanians.

Tasmania’s coastal waters have high biodiversity and endemism but are in a state of decline and increasing pressure from climate change, fishing and aquaculture operations, agricultural run-off, urban development, and population growth. Where problems have been identified, there is often no recovery or threat abatement plan.

Despite the environmental, economic and cultural significance of Tasmania’s coastal waters, it has been over a decade since the last integrated assessment of their health by resource managers. Legislative and regulatory frameworks that manage their use operate in isolation and need to be modernised and integrated. Only 1.1% of Tasmania’s marine waters are fully protected.

Download publication: PDF icon P964 Towards a sustainable marine management regime for Tasmania [Web].pdf

Source: Tasmanian Times https://tasmaniantimes.com/2020/10/lack-integrated-coastal-management-risks-industries-environment/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=lack-integrated-coastal-management-risks-industries-environment

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