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‘Impressive’ meteor over Canberra teases ‘spectacular’ show to come

Published: in 🇦🇺🦘Australian News🇦🇺🦘 by .

A meteor that blazed brightly across the Canberra sky last night is just a taster of what Australians can expect to see later this week.

A meteor that blazed brightly across the Canberra sky last night is just a taster of what Australians can expect to see later this week.

Canberra resident David Marriott filmed the meteor streaking through clear, starry skies above the Australian Capital Territory just before 8.30pm.

Australian National University astronomer Dr Brad Tucker described the video as "impressive", and he tipped Australians would be treated to a "spectacular" meteor shower later this week, if skies were clear.

The meteor shot across the Canberra night sky for a fleeting second.

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Last night's meteor was probably the size of a small pebble, Dr Tucker said.

"We can tell this by there was no sonic boom ... and also just how long and how bright it was."

The meteor was likely "only a few centimetres" in diameter.

Amateur astronomer Ian Musgrave told 9News.com.au the meteor spotted last night was a sporadic "bit of space dust" which had "slammed into our atmosphere".

It was not associated with the much-anticipated Eta Aquariids, he said.

The meteor filmed above Canberra last night is just a taster of the Eta Aquariids meteor shower, which this year will be best viewed on the mornings of May 7 - May 9.

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"The Eta Aquariids are one of the best southern hemisphere meteor showers (caused by) debris from Halley's Comet," Mr Musgrave said.

The best time to see Eta Aquariids this year will be early morning between May 7-9.

Dr Tucker said Australians across the country, but especially those in the north, were in for an Eta Aquariids treat.

"(Eta Aquariids) will look different than what was captured last night … because you get so many of them over the course of a few hours it looks quite spectacular."

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Darker winter night skies mean Australian star gazers are generally more likely to see meteors.

READ MORE: Meteorite flashes across the sky in Surfers Paradise

Contact: msaunoko@nine.com.au

FOLLOW: Mark Saunokonoko on Twitter

Source: 9News https://www.9news.com.au/national/meteor-canberra-sign-of-things-to-come-best-time-to-see-eta-aquariids/b9e401ae-3a4f-4150-a0c3-878690d2fa56

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